Saturday, May 18, 2013


Habanero chillis I grew in Singapore, originally from Mexico. Now Joseph grows them in Australia.

This is another unusual chilli. I don't know the name. Do you? This is grown at the winter garden at the Auckland domain.

Chillis crept into our diet. When our ancestors came from China in 1907, they didn't eat chilli. I remember when Grandpa didn't eat much. Now, we the 4th Generation Chans must have chilli with their meal.

In Singapore, I was given this habanero chilli, I ate the chilli and germinated the seeds. I got hundreds of chillis from my two plants. My friends were "burnt" by this very hot chilli from Mexico. Even my Indian friend's husband who could eat very hot food had to surrender to this little thing. All of us had great laughter when we tried the chilli.

The plant is gone but I have the photos. The original chilli came from Mexico, courtesy from my friend W. on his tours.

I also learnt that to beat this fireball, sip slowly milk, giving yourself a milky mustache, or take some yoghurt. This is from my research. It works like magic.

Habanero Hot Pepper (Red Savina™) PVP - Guinness WorldRecord HP426-10

Capsicum chinense. Plant produces good yields of 2" long by 1 ½" wide wrinkled hot peppers. Peppers are extremely hot and turn from green to shiny red when mature. Plant has green stems, green leaves, and white flowers. The Red Savina™ is protected by the Plant Variety Protection Act, #9200255. United States Department of Agriculture, PI 562384 PVPO. A variety developed in California, USA. pk/10

Height: 42"

Sunlight: Full Sun

HPLC Test Results: Guinness Records *

Guinness World Record Holder

* In 1994, the Red Savina was listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as one of the hottest spices. It is recorded as the hottest pepper at 577,000 Scoville units.

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